Beat the Heat and Get into The PoolBeat the Heat and Get into The Pool

Are you having trouble sticking with your exercise program because you’re bored with your usual program? Do you feel that you need to try something new but are afraid of re-aggravating an old injury? Do you feel like you need to improve your cardio and lose a few pounds? Do you feel there’s just not […]
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6 Things You Can Do to Maximize Your PT Sessions6 Things You Can Do to Maximize Your PT Sessions

Dedicating yourself to your health and rehabilitation takes a lot of time and effort. We want to help you achieve your goals to regain full function. Here are a few tips to help you benefit from your PT experience. 1. Consistency When your physician refers you to physical therapy, they usually recommend a series of […]
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Wake Up Call for Collegiate Athlete Sleep: Narrative Review and Consensus Recommendations from the NCAA Interassociation Task Force on Sleep and WellnessWake Up Call for Collegiate Athlete Sleep: Narrative Review and Consensus Recommendations from the NCAA Interassociation Task Force on Sleep and Wellness

Wake up call for collegiate athlete sleep: narrative review and consensus recommendations from the NCAA Interassociation Task Force on Sleep and Wellness.Kroshus E, Wagner J, Wyrick D, Athey A, Bell L, Benjamin HJ, Grandner MA, Kline CE, Mohler JM, Roxanne Prichard J, Watson NF, Hainline B. Br J Sports Med. 2019 May 16. pii: bjsports-2019-100590. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2019-100590. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Not Freely AvailableThe National Collegiate Athletic Association hosted a sleep summit in 2017 to address the lack of guidelines for sleep management and restorative sleep for collegiate athletes. Members of the Interassociation Task Force on Sleep and Wellness provided a review of four topics related to collegiate athlete sleep: “(1) sleep patterns and disorders among collegiate athletes; (2) sleep and optimal functioning among athletes; (3) screening, tracking and assessment of athlete sleep; and (4) interventions to improve sleep.” They also provided five recommendations.View 196 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….

Getting to the Core of Overuse Lower Extremity Injury Risk FactorsGetting to the Core of Overuse Lower Extremity Injury Risk Factors

Impaired Core Stability as a Risk Factor for the Development of Lower Extremity Overuse Injuries: A Prospective Cohort StudyDe Blaiser C, De Ridder R, Willems T, Vanden Bossche L, Danneels L, Roosen P. Am J Sports Med. 2019 Apr 29:363546519837724. doi: 10.1177/0363546519837724. [Epub ahead of print]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31034240Take Home Message: A college freshman with dynamic postural control limb imbalances, decreased hip extension strength, or decreased core muscle endurance during bridging exercises is more likely to develop a lower extremity overuse injury.Core stability is important for lower extremity alignment and control, and may relate to lower extremity overuse injuries. However, we lack information on how different tests of core performance are linked to injury risk among recreationally active young adults. Therefore, the authors performed a prospective 1.5-year study among 139 healthy freshmen students enrolled in physical education courses, and evaluated if different measures of core strength, endurance, or control related to future overuse lower extremity injury.Read more »…

Appropriate Medical Care Standards for Organizations Sponsoring Athletic Activity for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete: A Summary StatementAppropriate Medical Care Standards for Organizations Sponsoring Athletic Activity for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete: A Summary Statement

Appropriate Medical Care Standards for Organizations Sponsoring Athletic Activity for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete: A Summary Statement.Cooper L, Harper R, Wham GS Jr, Cates J, Chafin SJ Jr, Cohen RP, Dompier TP, Huggins RA, Newman D, Peterson B, McLeod TCV. J Athl Train. 2019 May 28. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-544-18. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Freely AvailableA new task force has reviewed the 2004 Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Aged Athlete consensus points and updated them based on the latest evidence. The new appropriate medical care standards were approved by the NATA Board of Directors in 2018. The authors address 12 standards and highlights an online toolkit to help schools and organizations address the standards included in this document.View 197 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….

Conservative Management May Reduce Repetitive ConcussionsConservative Management May Reduce Repetitive Concussions

Return to play and risk of repeat concussion in collegiate football players: comparative analysis from the NCAA Concussion Study (1999–2001) and CARE Consortium (2014–2017)          McCrea M, Broglio S, McAllister T, Zhou W, Zhao S, Katz B, Kudela M, Harezlak J, Nelson L, Meier T, Marshall SW, Guskiewicz KM, On behalf of CARE Consortium Investigators. Br J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/05/08/bjsports-2019-100579 Take Home Message: College football players diagnosed with a concussion are being managed more conservatively with stricter return-to-play protocols, which may be related to a lower risk of repeat concussions during a season compared to 15 years ago. Over the past 15 years, an increase in concussion awareness and research has lead to new policies, rule changes in sport, and enhanced concussion assessment and management protocols. Understanding how these changes influence outcomes, such as the risk of repeat concussion, may help support current policies and consensus recommendations. Hence, the authors compared data from two prospective cohorts to examine if injury management, return to play (RTP), and risk of repeated concussions among collegiate football players changed over 15 years.Read more »…

Who Gets Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?Who Gets Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Association between contact sports participation and chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a retrospective study. Bieniek KF, Blessing MM, Heckman MG, Diehl NN, Serie AM, Paolini MA, Boeve BF, Savica R, Reichard RR, and Dickson DW. Brain Pathol. 2019. [Epub Ahead of Print]. Full Text Freely Available                                                                         Take Home Message: Among 750 samples of brain tissue from individuals with and without a history of sport participation, less than 6% of people showed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)-related pathology. While most people don’t develop CTE, roughly 1 in 7 former football players had evidence of CTE-related pathology compared with ~1 in 18 peers.Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a debilitating neurological disorder that has gained a lot of attention because it is related to repeated brain trauma. Despite the media attention we know very little about whether the risk of developing CTE is related to participation in sports at nonelite levels of competition. The researchers of this study used the Mayo Clinic Tissue Registry to review samples of brain tissue from 300 former athletes and 450 non-athletes for the presence CTE pathology or features of CTE.Read more »…

OARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritisOARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritis

OARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritisBannuru RR, Osani MC, Vaysbrot EE, Arden N, Bennell K, Bierma-Zeinstra SMA, Kraus VB, Lohmander LS, Abbott JH, Bhandari M, Blanco F, Espinosa R, Haugen IK, Lin J, Mandl LA, Moilanen E, Nakamura N, Snyder-Mackler L, Trojian T, Underwood M, McAlindon TE. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2019 Jul 3. pii: S1063-4584(19)31116-1. doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2019.06.011. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Not Freely AvailableThe Osteoarthritis Research Society International has updated its guidelines for non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritis. The authors recommend core treatments, which are appropriate for use by most people in almost any situation and deemed safe for use in combination with first line and second line treatments. The authors also provided recommendations for people with various comorbidities (e.g., gastrointestinal or cardiovascular). View 201 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….