Hand Therapy: Thumb Arthritis and Trigger Point Dry NeedlingHand Therapy: Thumb Arthritis and Trigger Point Dry Needling

The most prevalent area of arthritis of any joint in the body is the 1st CMC joint which occurs at the base of the thumb. This joint is unique in that it is a saddle joint. One side is a dome and the other side is shaped like a U that fits on the dome. […]
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Repair may be Just as Good as ReconstructionRepair may be Just as Good as Reconstruction

Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Rupture: Repair or Reconstruction?Hoogeslag RAG, Brouwer RW, Boer BC, de Vries AJ, and Huis in ‘t Veld H. Am J Sports Med. 2019. [Epub Ahead of Print].https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0363546519825878Take Home Message: People who receive a dynamic augmented anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) repair have similar outcomes to those who receive an ACL reconstruction during the first 2 years after surgeryMany clinicians have discussed the pros and cons of a surgical reconstruction or conservative care for an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. In recent years, there has also been a renewed interest in re-assessing suture repair of a ruptured ACL. Therefore, Hoogeslag and colleagues completed a randomized trial to examine patient-reported, clinical, and radiological outcomes among young adults receiving a dynamic augmented ACL repair or ACL reconstruction.Read more »…

CrossFit Injuries, Kettlebell Grip, and How to Review an ArticleCrossFit Injuries, Kettlebell Grip, and How to Review an Article

Catch up on all my latest content and articles to read from around the web. This week’s Stuff You Should Read comes from the Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, Kiefer Lammi, and Erik Meira.
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The Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains LowThe Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains Low

Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Athletic Training: Common Measures, Selection Considerations, and Practical Barriers.Lam KC, Harrington KM, Cameron KL, Valier ARS. J Athl Train. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Freely AvailableTake Home Message: The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) remains low among athletic trainers; however, athletic trainers who use PROMs commonly use injury- or joint-specific PROMs or single-item PROMs. Time to complete and score PROMs are important barriers to using PROMs.The “Athletic Training Education Competencies” and the “Role Delineation/Practice Analysis” emphasizes the support for the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) into clinical practice to enhance patient care. However, athletic trainers appear reluctant to use them due to barriers such as time constraints. A better understanding of how athletic trainers perceive and use PROMs may help improve the adoption of PROMs into clinical practice. Therefore, the authors created a survey, which was distributed to ~18,000 athletic trainers to describe the commonly used PROMs, why those PROMS are selected, and barriers and reasons for not using PROMs.Read more »…

What Is Blood Flow Restriction and Is It Safe?What Is Blood Flow Restriction and Is It Safe?

There is a lot of talk about a newer treatment being utilized in strengthening and in rehab settings called Blood Flow Restriction (BFR). Essentially, BFR is taking a device such as a cuff or wrap and placing it around a limb to occlude partial blood blow to the affected area. When placing the cuff around the […]
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BEAR in Mind: There’s a New ACL Repair Technique on the BlockBEAR in Mind: There’s a New ACL Repair Technique on the Block

Bridge-Enhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair: Two-year results of a first-in-human studyMurray MM, Kalish LA, Fleming BC, Proffen BL, Ecklund K, Kramer DE, Yen YM, & Micheli LJ.  Ortho J Sports Med. 2019; 7(3).  DOI: 10.1177/2325967118824356  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2325967118824356Take Home Message: Bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament repair is producing similar outcomes to hamstring autograft reconstruction up to 2 years post-surgery. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgical reconstruction techniques are evolving to improve short- and long-term outcomes for patients after surgery.  A newer approach that is getting a lot of attention is the bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament repair(BEAR). To perform a BEAR, a surgeon repairs the ACL with sutures and a scaffold to promote optimal alignment and healing.  Before large clinical trials can be performed with this new procedure it is critical to have initial results to ensure it is safe and potentially beneficial. Hence, the authors conducted an observational cohort study of 10 participants who received a BEAR and 10 who received a hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction to assess physical exam findings, patient-reported outcomes, and adverse events at one and two years after surgery.Read more »…

How to Prepare for a Morning WorkoutHow to Prepare for a Morning Workout

There is nothing like a morning workout to get you going and ready to take on the day.  We all have busy lives and getting that workout in before everything else can help you check one very important task off your to-do list while helping you prepare for everything the day has in store for […]
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An Evaluation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Usage in Secondary School ATsAn Evaluation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Usage in Secondary School ATs

The Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: Secondary School Athletic Trainers' Perceptions, Practices, and Barriers.Coulombe BJ, Games KE, Eberman LE; J Athl Train. 2019 Feb;54(2):142-151. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-86-17. Epub 2018 Aug 10.Full Text Freely AvailableTake Home Message: Many secondary school athletic trainers viewed patient-reported outcomes as beneficial; however, skip using them because of time constraints (e.g., time to fill-out, score, or analyze).A clinician can use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to assess how a patient perceives their symptoms, function, and rehabilitation progress. PROs are an essential way to inform how patient-centered care is provided after an injury. Unfortunately, clinicians, especially secondary school athletic trainers, may skip using PROs for many reasons. Understanding how and why a secondary school athletic trainer uses PROs may lead to strategies to promote the use of PROs. Hence, the authors used a web-based survey to evaluate the views that exist regarding the application, benefits, and problems associated with implementing PROs in the clinical practice of secondary school athletic trainers.Read more »…

Pressure to See More Patients and Switching from Inpatient to OutpatientPressure to See More Patients and Switching from Inpatient to Outpatient

On this episode of the #AskMikeReinold show we talk about career advice on dealing with management that may be pressuring you to see more patients or treat a certain way, and on how to switch from inpatient to outpatient physical therapy.
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It’s Not Boys Being Boys on College Campus: Males in Fraternities and Sports More Likely to Commit Sexual Assaults Than Their PeersIt’s Not Boys Being Boys on College Campus: Males in Fraternities and Sports More Likely to Commit Sexual Assaults Than Their Peers

Is campus rape primarily a serial or one-time problem? Evidence from a multicampus studyFoubert JD, Clark-Taylor A, Wall AF. Violence Against Women. 2019, 1-16. DOI: 10.1177/1077801219833820https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1077801219833820Warning: This post includes sensitive information on sexual assault in the athletic community.Take Home Message: Nine in 10 alcohol-involved sexual assaults on college campuses are committed by serial perpetrators. Men in fraternities and athletics are more likely to commit this crime than other college-aged men.Social activities that include alcohol are often seen as a right of passage for many college-aged students. Unfortunately, alcohol use, especially high-risk drinking behaviors, plays a major role in sexual violence. Furthermore, male student-athletes and fraternity members are more likely to commit sexual assault against women than their peers. To develop an efficient strategy to address alcohol-involved sexual assault on college campuses it is critical to understand how prevalent it is and who is involved on today’s campuses. Hence, the authors aimed to use data from the Core Alcohol and Other Drug Survey, which captured data from 49 community and 4-year colleges in a Midwestern state to address 5 questions:Read more »…