Tag: concussions

Conservative Management May Reduce Repetitive ConcussionsConservative Management May Reduce Repetitive Concussions

Return to play and risk of repeat concussion in collegiate football players: comparative analysis from the NCAA Concussion Study (1999–2001) and CARE Consortium (2014–2017)          McCrea M, Broglio S, McAllister T, Zhou W, Zhao S, Katz B, Kudela M, Harezlak J, Nelson L, Meier T, Marshall SW, Guskiewicz KM, On behalf of CARE Consortium Investigators. Br J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/05/08/bjsports-2019-100579 Take Home Message: College football players diagnosed with a concussion are being managed more conservatively with stricter return-to-play protocols, which may be related to a lower risk of repeat concussions during a season compared to 15 years ago. Over the past 15 years, an increase in concussion awareness and research has lead to new policies, rule changes in sport, and enhanced concussion assessment and management protocols. Understanding how these changes influence outcomes, such as the risk of repeat concussion, may help support current policies and consensus recommendations. Hence, the authors compared data from two prospective cohorts to examine if injury management, return to play (RTP), and risk of repeated concussions among collegiate football players changed over 15 years.Read more »…

Who Gets Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?Who Gets Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Association between contact sports participation and chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a retrospective study. Bieniek KF, Blessing MM, Heckman MG, Diehl NN, Serie AM, Paolini MA, Boeve BF, Savica R, Reichard RR, and Dickson DW. Brain Pathol. 2019. [Epub Ahead of Print]. Full Text Freely Available                                                                         Take Home Message: Among 750 samples of brain tissue from individuals with and without a history of sport participation, less than 6% of people showed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)-related pathology. While most people don’t develop CTE, roughly 1 in 7 former football players had evidence of CTE-related pathology compared with ~1 in 18 peers.Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a debilitating neurological disorder that has gained a lot of attention because it is related to repeated brain trauma. Despite the media attention we know very little about whether the risk of developing CTE is related to participation in sports at nonelite levels of competition. The researchers of this study used the Mayo Clinic Tissue Registry to review samples of brain tissue from 300 former athletes and 450 non-athletes for the presence CTE pathology or features of CTE.Read more »…

Parents are Open to Age Restrictions for Tackling in FootballParents are Open to Age Restrictions for Tackling in Football

Parents’ Perspectives Regarding Age Restriction for Tackling in Youth FootballChrisman S, Whitlock KB, Kroshus E, Schwien C, Herring SA, Rivara FP. Pediatrics. 2019; 143(5) [Epub ahead of print]. https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2019/03/28/peds.2018-2402?sso=1&sso_redirect_count=1&nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+tokenTake Home Message: In the United States, the majority of parents (61%) support a minimum age for tackling in football. An additional 24% indicated that they would “maybe” support such an age limit. In recent years, there have been increasing concerns about the acute and chronic effects of concussive and sub-concussive head impacts that occur during sports. Some sport organizations like US Soccer and USA Hockey have recently implemented age restrictions on heading and checking respectively with marked success with reducing injury in the latter. Despite football being the most popular youth sport for boys, no such age restriction exists for tackling. Furthermore, it is unclear if the public would support such restrictions if they were imposed. Therefore, Chrisman and colleagues surveyed a nationally representative sample of parents with school-aged children to determine the level of national support present for age restrictions on tackling.Read more »…

Rest Days are Unrelated with Concussion RatesRest Days are Unrelated with Concussion Rates

National Rugby League Match Scheduling and Rate of ConcussionGardner AJ, Howell DR, Iverson GL. J Sci Med Sport. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30885613Take Home Message: A rugby player was most likely to sustain a concussion during the first rugby match of the year compared with any other match. The number of rest days before a match was unrelated to concussions.Rugby athletes are at high risk of suffering a concussion during a match. Over the past 12 years in Australia, the National Rugby League (NRL) added matches on Mondays (beginning of 2007 season) and Thursdays (beginning of 2012) rather than just on weekends. The scheduling changes resulted in fewer rest days during the 24-game season. Additionally, the NRL introduced the “concussion interchange rule” at the beginning of the 2014 season to allow for proper concussion medical care. This rule allows for a brief (up to 15 minutes) sideline concussion evaluation to decide if a player has a concussion and should be removed from play or if not then to return without costing the team one of its 12 player interchanges. No one has studied if the decreased rest time is associated with a higher rate of concussion or was more likely to…

International consensus definitions of video signs of concussion in professional sports.International consensus definitions of video signs of concussion in professional sports.

International consensus definitions of video signs of concussion in professional sports.Davis GA, Makdissi M, Bloomfield P, Clifton P, Echemendia RJ, Falvey ÉC, Fuller GW, Green G, Harcourt P, Hill T, McGuirk N, Meeuwisse W, Orchard J, Raftery M, Sills AK, Solomon GS, Valadka A, McCrory P. Br J Sports Med. 2019 Apr 6. pii: bjsports-2019-100628. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2019-100628. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Not Freely AvailableRepresentatives from seven sporting bodies (Australian Football League, Cricket Australia, Major League Baseball, NFL, NHL, National Rugby League, World Rugby) reached consensus on video signs considered most useful in identifying a possible concussion. The key signs were lying motionless, motor incoordination, impact seizure, tonic posturing, no protective action – floppy, and blank/vacant look. These signs are defined in the consensus statement. View 191 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….