Tag: Jane McDevitt

Conservative Management May Reduce Repetitive ConcussionsConservative Management May Reduce Repetitive Concussions

Return to play and risk of repeat concussion in collegiate football players: comparative analysis from the NCAA Concussion Study (1999–2001) and CARE Consortium (2014–2017)          McCrea M, Broglio S, McAllister T, Zhou W, Zhao S, Katz B, Kudela M, Harezlak J, Nelson L, Meier T, Marshall SW, Guskiewicz KM, On behalf of CARE Consortium Investigators. Br J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/05/08/bjsports-2019-100579 Take Home Message: College football players diagnosed with a concussion are being managed more conservatively with stricter return-to-play protocols, which may be related to a lower risk of repeat concussions during a season compared to 15 years ago. Over the past 15 years, an increase in concussion awareness and research has lead to new policies, rule changes in sport, and enhanced concussion assessment and management protocols. Understanding how these changes influence outcomes, such as the risk of repeat concussion, may help support current policies and consensus recommendations. Hence, the authors compared data from two prospective cohorts to examine if injury management, return to play (RTP), and risk of repeated concussions among collegiate football players changed over 15 years.Read more »…

Rest Days are Unrelated with Concussion RatesRest Days are Unrelated with Concussion Rates

National Rugby League Match Scheduling and Rate of ConcussionGardner AJ, Howell DR, Iverson GL. J Sci Med Sport. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30885613Take Home Message: A rugby player was most likely to sustain a concussion during the first rugby match of the year compared with any other match. The number of rest days before a match was unrelated to concussions.Rugby athletes are at high risk of suffering a concussion during a match. Over the past 12 years in Australia, the National Rugby League (NRL) added matches on Mondays (beginning of 2007 season) and Thursdays (beginning of 2012) rather than just on weekends. The scheduling changes resulted in fewer rest days during the 24-game season. Additionally, the NRL introduced the “concussion interchange rule” at the beginning of the 2014 season to allow for proper concussion medical care. This rule allows for a brief (up to 15 minutes) sideline concussion evaluation to decide if a player has a concussion and should be removed from play or if not then to return without costing the team one of its 12 player interchanges. No one has studied if the decreased rest time is associated with a higher rate of concussion or was more likely to…

PASS Passes to Evaluate Success of Anterior Cruciate Ligament ReconstructionPASS Passes to Evaluate Success of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Prospective Evaluation of the Patient Acceptable Symptom State to Identify Clinically Successful Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction        Vega JF, Jacobs CA, Strnad GJ, Farrow L, Jones MH, Miniaci A, Parker RD, Rosneck J, Saluan P, Williams JS, Spindler KP. Am J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546519831008Take Home Message: A single Patient Acceptable Symptom State question may be enough to identify a patient who views their knee recovery as unsuccessful after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Many clinicians omit patient-reported outcome measuresduring evaluations because they are at least in part to time consuming. For example, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which is commonly used following an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to measure a patient’s view of their recovery, has over 40 questions. One way to reduce the burden on a patient is to use a single-item, patient-reported outcome measure such as the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS). However, there has been no research to determine if a PASS question could be a surrogate for a lengthier joint-specific patient-reported outcome measure. Hence, the authors conducted a cohort study to determine if the response to a PASS question would relate to a successful outcome 1 year after an…

The Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains LowThe Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains Low

Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Athletic Training: Common Measures, Selection Considerations, and Practical Barriers.Lam KC, Harrington KM, Cameron KL, Valier ARS. J Athl Train. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Freely AvailableTake Home Message: The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) remains low among athletic trainers; however, athletic trainers who use PROMs commonly use injury- or joint-specific PROMs or single-item PROMs. Time to complete and score PROMs are important barriers to using PROMs.The “Athletic Training Education Competencies” and the “Role Delineation/Practice Analysis” emphasizes the support for the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) into clinical practice to enhance patient care. However, athletic trainers appear reluctant to use them due to barriers such as time constraints. A better understanding of how athletic trainers perceive and use PROMs may help improve the adoption of PROMs into clinical practice. Therefore, the authors created a survey, which was distributed to ~18,000 athletic trainers to describe the commonly used PROMs, why those PROMS are selected, and barriers and reasons for not using PROMs.Read more »…