Tag: Nicole Cattano

SI Dysfunction? Manipulate it, Exercise it, or BOTHSI Dysfunction? Manipulate it, Exercise it, or BOTH

Effectiveness of Exercise Therapy and Manipulation on Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction: A Randomized Controlled TrialNejati P, Safarcherati A, & Karimi F.  Pain Physician. 2019; 22:53-61. Full Text Freely AvailableTake Home Message: Overall, exercise and manipulation may provide early improvements for patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction. However, patients should be re-evaluated before 6 months to determine treatment plans moving forward since the combination of exercise and manipulation was not better than performing exercise or mobilizations alone after 6 months.Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a common cause of low back pain.  While exercise is considered to be effective for generalized low back pain, it remains unclear what is the best way to treat low back pain caused by sacroiliac joint dysfunction.  The authors of this study conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise therapy, manipulation therapy, and exercises + manipulation therapy among people with sacroiliac joint dysfunction.Read more »…

BEAR in Mind: There’s a New ACL Repair Technique on the BlockBEAR in Mind: There’s a New ACL Repair Technique on the Block

Bridge-Enhanced Anterior Cruciate Ligament Repair: Two-year results of a first-in-human studyMurray MM, Kalish LA, Fleming BC, Proffen BL, Ecklund K, Kramer DE, Yen YM, & Micheli LJ.  Ortho J Sports Med. 2019; 7(3).  DOI: 10.1177/2325967118824356  https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2325967118824356Take Home Message: Bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament repair is producing similar outcomes to hamstring autograft reconstruction up to 2 years post-surgery. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) surgical reconstruction techniques are evolving to improve short- and long-term outcomes for patients after surgery.  A newer approach that is getting a lot of attention is the bridge-enhanced anterior cruciate ligament repair(BEAR). To perform a BEAR, a surgeon repairs the ACL with sutures and a scaffold to promote optimal alignment and healing.  Before large clinical trials can be performed with this new procedure it is critical to have initial results to ensure it is safe and potentially beneficial. Hence, the authors conducted an observational cohort study of 10 participants who received a BEAR and 10 who received a hamstring autograft ACL reconstruction to assess physical exam findings, patient-reported outcomes, and adverse events at one and two years after surgery.Read more »…

The Heat is On – But Many States Are Leaving Us Out in the ColdThe Heat is On – But Many States Are Leaving Us Out in the Cold

The Association between Mandated Preseason Heat Acclimatization Guidelines and Exertional Heat Illness during Preseason High School American Football PracticesKerr ZY, Reigster-Mihalik JK, Pryor RR, Pierpoint LA, Scareno SE, Adams WM, Kucera KL, Casa DJ, & Marshall SW.  Environ Health Perspect. 2019; 127(4).  DOI: 10.1289/EHP4163  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30969138 Take Home Message: Mandating the use of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force (NATA-IATF) “acclimatization” guidelines in high school football is related to fewer athletes experiencing exercise-induced heat illness.  The authors of the 2009 NATA-IATF “acclimatization” guidelines aimed to reduce exertional heat illnesses, which include heat stroke, heat syncope, heat exhaustion, and heat edema. Some state high school athletic associations have implemented these guidelines, yet the effectiveness of these guidelines is unknown.  Kerr and his colleagues assessed the relationship between state high school athletic associations adopting the NATA-IATF guidelines and the rate of exertional heat illnesses among high school students during preseason American football practices.Read more »…