Tag: patient-reported outcomes

Patients May Not Feel As Good As They Look On PaperPatients May Not Feel As Good As They Look On Paper

It Is Good To Feel Better, But Better To Feel Good: Whether A Patient Finds Treatment ‘Successful’ Or Not Depends On The Questions Researchers AskRoos EM, Boyle E, Frobell RB, Lohmander LS, Ingelsrud LH. Br J Sports Med. 2019 Apr. doi:10.1136/ bjsports-2018-100260. Epub Ahead of Print https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31072841 Take Home Message:While patients may exceed minimal important change on patient-reported outcome scores after an ACL injury, many feel their treatment was unsuccessful. We commonly use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures in clinical trials to determine the success or failure of a treatment regimen after a musculoskeletal injury. Several PROs are readily available to clinicians, yet these measurements often focus on a patient’s functional ability or symptoms and not their satisfaction with how they feel after treatment.  When clinicians focus on a change score from baseline to follow-up it tells them if a patient is “feeling better,” but not if a patient “feels good.” It’s important to appreciate how these different ways to interpret PROs may alter the reported benefit of a treatment. Hence, the authors applied three different criteria to determine responders and non-responders in the KANON trial, which was a high-quality randomized trial that compared (1) exercise therapy and early anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction…

PASS Passes to Evaluate Success of Anterior Cruciate Ligament ReconstructionPASS Passes to Evaluate Success of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

Prospective Evaluation of the Patient Acceptable Symptom State to Identify Clinically Successful Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction        Vega JF, Jacobs CA, Strnad GJ, Farrow L, Jones MH, Miniaci A, Parker RD, Rosneck J, Saluan P, Williams JS, Spindler KP. Am J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0363546519831008Take Home Message: A single Patient Acceptable Symptom State question may be enough to identify a patient who views their knee recovery as unsuccessful after an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Many clinicians omit patient-reported outcome measuresduring evaluations because they are at least in part to time consuming. For example, the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), which is commonly used following an anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction to measure a patient’s view of their recovery, has over 40 questions. One way to reduce the burden on a patient is to use a single-item, patient-reported outcome measure such as the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS). However, there has been no research to determine if a PASS question could be a surrogate for a lengthier joint-specific patient-reported outcome measure. Hence, the authors conducted a cohort study to determine if the response to a PASS question would relate to a successful outcome 1 year after an…

The Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains LowThe Use of PROMs Among Athletic Trainers Remains Low

Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Athletic Training: Common Measures, Selection Considerations, and Practical Barriers.Lam KC, Harrington KM, Cameron KL, Valier ARS. J Athl Train. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Freely AvailableTake Home Message: The use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) remains low among athletic trainers; however, athletic trainers who use PROMs commonly use injury- or joint-specific PROMs or single-item PROMs. Time to complete and score PROMs are important barriers to using PROMs.The “Athletic Training Education Competencies” and the “Role Delineation/Practice Analysis” emphasizes the support for the implementation of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) into clinical practice to enhance patient care. However, athletic trainers appear reluctant to use them due to barriers such as time constraints. A better understanding of how athletic trainers perceive and use PROMs may help improve the adoption of PROMs into clinical practice. Therefore, the authors created a survey, which was distributed to ~18,000 athletic trainers to describe the commonly used PROMs, why those PROMS are selected, and barriers and reasons for not using PROMs.Read more »…

An Evaluation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Usage in Secondary School ATsAn Evaluation of Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Usage in Secondary School ATs

The Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures: Secondary School Athletic Trainers' Perceptions, Practices, and Barriers.Coulombe BJ, Games KE, Eberman LE; J Athl Train. 2019 Feb;54(2):142-151. doi:10.4085/1062-6050-86-17. Epub 2018 Aug 10.Full Text Freely AvailableTake Home Message: Many secondary school athletic trainers viewed patient-reported outcomes as beneficial; however, skip using them because of time constraints (e.g., time to fill-out, score, or analyze).A clinician can use patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to assess how a patient perceives their symptoms, function, and rehabilitation progress. PROs are an essential way to inform how patient-centered care is provided after an injury. Unfortunately, clinicians, especially secondary school athletic trainers, may skip using PROs for many reasons. Understanding how and why a secondary school athletic trainer uses PROs may lead to strategies to promote the use of PROs. Hence, the authors used a web-based survey to evaluate the views that exist regarding the application, benefits, and problems associated with implementing PROs in the clinical practice of secondary school athletic trainers.Read more »…