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Getting to the Core of Overuse Lower Extremity Injury Risk Factors

Impaired Core Stability as a Risk Factor for the Development of Lower Extremity Overuse Injuries: A Prospective Cohort StudyDe Blaiser C, De Ridder R, Willems T, Vanden Bossche L, Danneels L, Roosen P. Am J Sports Med. 2019 Apr 29:363546519837724. doi: 10.1177/0363546519837724. [Epub ahead of print]https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31034240Take Home Message: A college freshman with dynamic postural control limb imbalances, decreased hip extension strength, or decreased core muscle endurance during bridging exercises is more likely to develop a lower extremity overuse injury.Core stability is important for lower extremity alignment and control, and may relate to lower extremity overuse injuries. However, we lack information on how different tests of core performance are linked to injury risk among recreationally active young adults. Therefore, the authors performed a prospective 1.5-year study among 139 healthy freshmen students enrolled in physical education courses, and evaluated if different measures of core strength, endurance, or control related to future overuse lower extremity injury.Read more »…

Appropriate Medical Care Standards for Organizations Sponsoring Athletic Activity for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete: A Summary Statement

Appropriate Medical Care Standards for Organizations Sponsoring Athletic Activity for the Secondary School-Aged Athlete: A Summary Statement.Cooper L, Harper R, Wham GS Jr, Cates J, Chafin SJ Jr, Cohen RP, Dompier TP, Huggins RA, Newman D, Peterson B, McLeod TCV. J Athl Train. 2019 May 28. doi: 10.4085/1062-6050-544-18. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Freely AvailableA new task force has reviewed the 2004 Appropriate Medical Care for Secondary School-Aged Athlete consensus points and updated them based on the latest evidence. The new appropriate medical care standards were approved by the NATA Board of Directors in 2018. The authors address 12 standards and highlights an online toolkit to help schools and organizations address the standards included in this document.View 197 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….

Conservative Management May Reduce Repetitive Concussions

Return to play and risk of repeat concussion in collegiate football players: comparative analysis from the NCAA Concussion Study (1999–2001) and CARE Consortium (2014–2017)          McCrea M, Broglio S, McAllister T, Zhou W, Zhao S, Katz B, Kudela M, Harezlak J, Nelson L, Meier T, Marshall SW, Guskiewicz KM, On behalf of CARE Consortium Investigators. Br J Sports Med. 2019 [Epub ahead of print]https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2019/05/08/bjsports-2019-100579 Take Home Message: College football players diagnosed with a concussion are being managed more conservatively with stricter return-to-play protocols, which may be related to a lower risk of repeat concussions during a season compared to 15 years ago. Over the past 15 years, an increase in concussion awareness and research has lead to new policies, rule changes in sport, and enhanced concussion assessment and management protocols. Understanding how these changes influence outcomes, such as the risk of repeat concussion, may help support current policies and consensus recommendations. Hence, the authors compared data from two prospective cohorts to examine if injury management, return to play (RTP), and risk of repeated concussions among collegiate football players changed over 15 years.Read more »…

Who Gets Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy?

Association between contact sports participation and chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a retrospective study. Bieniek KF, Blessing MM, Heckman MG, Diehl NN, Serie AM, Paolini MA, Boeve BF, Savica R, Reichard RR, and Dickson DW. Brain Pathol. 2019. [Epub Ahead of Print]. Full Text Freely Available                                                                         Take Home Message: Among 750 samples of brain tissue from individuals with and without a history of sport participation, less than 6% of people showed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE)-related pathology. While most people don’t develop CTE, roughly 1 in 7 former football players had evidence of CTE-related pathology compared with ~1 in 18 peers.Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a debilitating neurological disorder that has gained a lot of attention because it is related to repeated brain trauma. Despite the media attention we know very little about whether the risk of developing CTE is related to participation in sports at nonelite levels of competition. The researchers of this study used the Mayo Clinic Tissue Registry to review samples of brain tissue from 300 former athletes and 450 non-athletes for the presence CTE pathology or features of CTE.Read more »…

Taking Steps after Ankle Sprains (Webinar)

Danielle Torp, a Sports Med Res contributor and PhD Student at the University of North Caroline – Charlotte, leads our webinar entitled “Taking Steps after Ankle Sprains”….

OARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritis

OARSI guidelines for the non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritisBannuru RR, Osani MC, Vaysbrot EE, Arden N, Bennell K, Bierma-Zeinstra SMA, Kraus VB, Lohmander LS, Abbott JH, Bhandari M, Blanco F, Espinosa R, Haugen IK, Lin J, Mandl LA, Moilanen E, Nakamura N, Snyder-Mackler L, Trojian T, Underwood M, McAlindon TE. Osteoarthritis Cartilage. 2019 Jul 3. pii: S1063-4584(19)31116-1. doi: 10.1016/j.joca.2019.06.011. [Epub ahead of print]Full Text is Not Freely AvailableThe Osteoarthritis Research Society International has updated its guidelines for non-surgical management of knee, hip, and polyarticular osteoarthritis. The authors recommend core treatments, which are appropriate for use by most people in almost any situation and deemed safe for use in combination with first line and second line treatments. The authors also provided recommendations for people with various comorbidities (e.g., gastrointestinal or cardiovascular). View 201 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine….

Sudden Death Among Youth Sport Athletes in the United States

Epidemiology of Sudden Death in Organized Youth Sports in the United States, 2007-2015Endres BD, Kerr ZY, Stearns RL, Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Huggins RA, Kucera KL, Casa DJ. Journal of Athletic Training. 2019;54(4):349–355Full Text Freely AvailableTake Home Message: During the years 2007-2015, there were 45 sudden deaths among youth sport athletes (middle school, youth leagues, recreational sports). Sudden deaths were typically cardiac related (76%) and most common among males or basketball players and during practice (71%). In the year 2015 alone, more than 28 million youth athletes between the ages of 6 and 17 years participated in sports. While researchers have extensively studied sudden death in athletics in high school or collegiate populations, little is known about sudden death among individuals who compete in youth sports outside of the high school setting. Therefore, Endres and colleagues described the epidemiology of sudden death among athletes aged 6 to 17 years participating in organized middle school, youth league, or recreational sports in the United States.Read more »…

How to Stay Safe in the Arizona Sun

June is here and the temperature is starting to rise after a cooler May. Kids are out of school and summer vacation is in full swing. Growing up in Arizona means we are out in the sun a lot during the summer. Being safe in the sun is very important while going on a hike […]
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Early Sports Specialization, Medball Chest Pass, and Foam Roll Ridges

Catch up on all my latest content and articles to read from around the web. This week’s Stuff You Should Read comes from Science for Sport, Nick Esposito, and the Journal of Body Work and Movement Therapies.
The post Early Sports Specialization, Medball Chest Pass, and Foam Roll Ridges appeared first on Mike Reinold. …

International Expert Consensus on a Cell Therapy Communication Tool: DOSES

International Expert Consensus on a Cell Therapy Communication Tool: DOSESMurray IR, Chahla J, Safran MR, Krych AJ, Saris DBF, Caplan AI, LaPrade RF. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2019 May 15;101(10):904-911. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.18.00915.Full Text is Not Freely AvailableAn international consensus process has yielded a new consensus statement that aims to develop “strategies to improve standardization and transparency when describing cell therapies. The secondary aim was to develop a consensus among experts on the contents of a standardized tool for describing cell therapies”. The “DOSES” acronym stands for reporting donor, origin tissue, separation method, exhibited cell characteristics associated with behavior, and site of delivery. The authors hope that a tool like “DOSES” will help clinicians and patients understand the characteristics of each cell therapy.View 198 other recent position statements, consensus statements, guidelines, and recommendations related to sports medicine.See also…Rodeo SA. A Call for Standardization in Cell Therapy Studies: Commentary on an article by Iain R. Murray, BMedSci(Hons), MRCS, MFSEM, PhD, et al.: “International Expert Consensus on a Cell Therapy Communication Tool: DOSES”. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2019 May 15;101(10):e47. doi: 10.2106/JBJS.19.00189….